30 years ago today - May 16, 1992

The Deseret News reports that students at Ricks College, the second largest LDS school, elected twin sisters, Kris and Kim Shelley, as president and vice-president of students. The was the first female president there since World War II, during the shortage of male students.

[The Mormon Hierarchy - Extensions of Power by D. Michael Quinn, [New Mormon History database (http://bit.ly/NMHdatabase)]]

70 years ago today - May 16, 1952

[Stephen L. Richards]
President Richards mentioned that Rabbi Fink had talked to the students at the B.Y.U. on racial discrimination, and said we don't always get the right stand on this so-called broadmindedness and tolerance, which sometimes is inconsistent with the real doctrines of the Gospel. Said he didn't know that Rabbi Fink did any harm just talking to the general proposition of racial discrimination, but the more we give recognition to these so-called liberals, the more we hazard to a small degree at least the true concepts of our youth with reference to the intolerance of the Lord's word, as it always has been and always will be intolerant of other than the true interpretation.

[The Diaries of J. Reuben Clark, 1933-1961, Abridged, Digital Edition Salt Lake City, Utah 2015, Appendix 2, The Diaries of Marion G. Romney, 1941-1961, Abridged]

120 years ago today - May 16, 1902

Benjamin Cluff is sustained as president of Brigham Young Academy (later BYU) but "censured for some of his doings in trip to the South Land." On an ill-fated expedition to South America to find evidence supporting the Book of Mormon the previous year Cluff had taken a plural wife.

135 years ago today - May 16, 1887

[Joseph Rogers]
I was often in Palmyra, and was well acquainted with Jo Smith, who became the Mormon prophet. When a young man he claimed to receive revelations from the Lord where treasures were buried. He told Peter Rupert and Mr. Cunningham, a blacksmith (simple-minded old men), that there was a chest of gold buried on my brother-in-law, Henry Murphy's, farm, under a beech tree. Henry's younger brother, Jack, said that must be stopped, and he obtained some filth in a sap bucket and got up in the beech tree before they arrived in the evening. They came and Mr. Rupert held the Bible open and a lighted candle as prophet Jo directed, while Peter dug for the chest of gold. Jack called Peter three times and he looked up and said, "Here am I, Lord," and received the filth in his face. Peter told me and others that the Lord chastised him and he had to stop his digging. He said he paid Jo for the information. I told him he ought not to believe Jo, for he was a liar and imposter. He said Jo would put a spell on him and that he would have to stand two weeks. He said Jo had perfect command over men. He believed he was a prophet. ... Many of Jo's victims were from New Jersey and believed in witches and ghosts. He could not fool the New England or York State Yankees. Jo Smith and his adherents dug a cave in a hill in Manchester, N.Y., and used to go there, he said, to consult with the Lord. He had a door at the entrance fastened with a padlock. The sheriff took possession and found much property which had been stolen from farmers about there. Jo had left for Ohio. It was believed that Jo intended to remove the property.

... His father, old Jo, was called a devil. He was very intemperate, profane and vulgar in conversation. Jo, the prophet, said much about his troubles with the devil and that he, the devil, got the better of him much of the time.

. . . But few persons about Palmyra and Manchester became Mormons. Jo, the prophet, pretended to tell fortunes for pay. He could read the character of men readily and could tell who he could dupe.

[Naked Truths About Mormonism (April 1888): 1., as cited in Dan Vogel, Early Mormon Documents: Joseph Rogers Statement]

140 years ago today - May 16, 1882

[Wilford Woodruff]
John Parry Died to day Master Mason of Logan Temple.

[Wilford Woodruff's Journal: 1833-1898 Typescript, Volumes 1-9, Edited by Scott G. Kenney, Signature Books 1993, http://amzn.to/newmormonstudies]

145 years ago today - May 16, 1877

[Wilford Woodruff]
16 There was 119 Endowments & 37 Elders ordained. D H Cannon sealed 16 Couple J D. T. McAllister 30 Couple and gave two second Anointing and Adopted 8. I thought I was poisond to death to day with a tea made of Indian root which was recommended good for my lungs. After swallowing 3 tea spoonfulls I turned deadly sick for two hours. I felt as though I would die. I drank sweet oil, No 6, and Cayenne pepper tea which finally eased my distress. There was quite a Change Came over my whole system in the Evening. I rested well through the night. Br George Jarvis watched with me for several nights.

[Wilford Woodruff's Journal: 1833-1898 Typescript, Volumes 1-9, Edited by Scott G. Kenney, Signature Books 1993, http://amzn.to/newmormonstudies]

170 years ago today - May 16, 1852. Sunday.

[William Clayton]
At 2 o clock D. B. Huntington talked to the Indians who live in this neighborhood. He told them to quite stealing from the Mormons and go to work as Mormons do. He told them to cease killing Indians told them the doctrine of baptism hinted at the resurrection, and told them that God made the land for Mormons as well as them. He advised them to cease trading children to the Spaniards, but if the[y] will trade children let the Mormons have them that they may be taught to read and write and be clothed like Mormons are. If they will go to work as Mormons do, in a while they will have cattle and houses and wagons as the Mormons have.

Canosha their chief replied, that he heard what has been said and it is good and they will do it. They will not Rile any more, nor steal from the Mormons but will go to work. He says, when they see the Mormons eat cattle and they are hungry it is hard work to keep from Killing them, but they will Kill no more. They appeared pleased with the conversation.

[George D. Smith, An Intimate Chronicle; The Journals of William Clayton, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1995, http://bit.ly/WilliamClayton]

175 years ago today - May 16, 1847

William Clayton writes, "About noon today Brother Appleton Harmon completed the machinery on the wagon called a 'roadometer' by adding a wheel to revolve once in ten miles, showing each mile and also each quarter mile we travel, and then casing the whole over so as to secure it from the weather. We are now prepared to tell accurately the distance we travel from day to day, which will supercede the idea of guessing, and be a satisfaction not only to this Camp, but to all who hereafter travel this way." Earlier Clayton was upset that Harmon had been "trying to have it understood that he invented the machinery" rather than simply having constructed it following Clayton's and Orson Pratt's instructions.

180 years ago today - May 16, 1842

Former assistant president John C. Bennett resigns as mayor, is disfellowshipped on 25 May, and expelled as a Mason by 16 June. An order of excommunication is drawn up on 11 May but not published until 23 June.

[Anderson, Lavina Fielding, Editor, Lucy's Book: A Critical Edition of Lucy Mack Smith's Family Memoir, 2001, Signature Books, http://bit.ly/lucys-book]

180 years ago today - May 16, 1842

Joseph publishes facsimile No. 3 from the Book of Abraham on the front page of the Times and Seasons.

[Conkling, Christopher J., Joseph Smith Chronology]

105 years ago today - May 15, 1917

Closing date to enter the Presiding Bishopric's contest: "With a view of stimulating the production of foodstuffs which may be badly needed in these war times,.the Trustee-in-Trust offers to any ward quorum of the priesthood, or any ward Relief Society, Young Men's or Young Ladies' Mutual Improvement Association, Sunday School, Primary Association or Religion Class, for the best yield from one acre of potatoes, $1,000; for the second best, $500; third best, $250; and for the best yield from five acres of spring wheat, $1,000; for second best, $500; third best, $250."

140 years ago today - May 15, 1882

[Wilford Woodruff]
15 I received a letter from A. F. McDonald. Sister Hamblin Called and asked some advice.

[Wilford Woodruff's Journal: 1833-1898 Typescript, Volumes 1-9, Edited by Scott G. Kenney, Signature Books 1993, http://amzn.to/newmormonstudies]

145 years ago today - May 15, 1877

[Wilford Woodruff]
15th There was 701 Baptized to day for the dead. J D T McAllister sealed 1 Couple. I was vary weak through the day. Rested well at night.

[Wilford Woodruff's Journal: 1833-1898 Typescript, Volumes 1-9, Edited by Scott G. Kenney, Signature Books 1993, http://amzn.to/newmormonstudies]

150 years ago today - May 15, 1872

[Wilford Woodruff]
15 I spent the day Making fence.

[Wilford Woodruff's Journal: 1833-1898 Typescript, Volumes 1-9, Edited by Scott G. Kenney, Signature Books 1993, http://amzn.to/newmormonstudies]

155 years ago today - May 15, 1867

[Wilford Woodruff]
Returns to Salt Lake City

[Kenney, Scott (editor), Wilford Woodruff's Journals 1833-1898, Chronology Signature Books, Midvale, Utah, http://bit.ly/wwjournal]

155 years ago today - May 15, 1867

[Wilford Woodruff]
15 We drove to Lehi and dined. We then drove to Great salt Lake City and there met with a warm reception by meeting with Ten thousand Men, women & Children parraded in the street with there banners a flying bareing mottoes. It was a glorious Sight. 55 M.

[Wilford Woodruff's Journal: 1833-1898 Typescript, Volumes 1-9, Edited by Scott G. Kenney, Signature Books 1993, http://amzn.to/newmormonstudies]

160 years ago today - May 15, 1862 - Thursday

[George Q. Cannon]
Thursday, May 15th, 1862. I slept very soundly all night and felt much refreshed this morning. There was more motion than there had been and it affected me to unpleasantly to a slight extent. I was able to eat a light breakfast. We came in sight of Queenstown a few minutes after 11 a.m. and dropped anchor about 1/2 past 11. This harbor is most beautiful and the surrounding country presents a very fine appearance. The surface of the bay is as smooth as glass and everything is pleasing to look upon. There are a number of vessels lying at anchor in the harbor. This place, until the Queen's visit to Ireland, was called the Cove of Cork. She landed here, and it changed its name and since then it has grown into an importance which it previously did not possess. Cork is 10 miles up the river. We expect to remain here until nearly 4 p.m. I wrote a long letter to Elizabeth. Loaded all the steerage passengers we could carry and some more Cabin do.

I have been very sea-sick since we left Queenstown and was unable to eat on Friday and Saturday, the 16th and 17th. By lying down, when I wished to keep still, I was able to avoid vomiting; but if I attempted to sit or stand for during several days I was sure to be sick. As it was very stifling and oppressive in the State Room, I kept on deck as much as possible, and by walking constantly I was able to keep up. Bro. Rich was almost all the time well; he only missed one meal; but Bro's Lyman, Dame and Cousin George were very sick; Bro. Van Cott did not escape, though not as sick as the others named. Next to Bro. Rich, very much to my surprise and agreeable disappointment, I was the least sick. I missed but few meals and when able to sit down to the table my appetite was very hearty. From the time we left <the> Channel we had a constant head wind, blowing right in our teeth. Some of the time it was squally and very rough. The vessel behaved handsomely and evinced splendid staunch, sea-going qualities.

[The Journal of George Q. Cannon, 1855–1875, Church Historian's Press, 2016, https://churchhistorianspress.org/george-q-cannon]

160 years ago today - May 15, 1862 - Thursday

[George Q. Cannon]
Thursday, May 15th, 1862. I slept very soundly all night and felt much refreshed this morning. There was more motion than there had been and it affected me [DEL: to] unpleasantly to a slight extent. I was able to eat a light breakfast. We came in sight of Queenstown a few minutes after 11 a.m. and dropped anchor about 1/2 past 11. This harbor is most beautiful and the surrounding country presents a very fine appearance. The surface of the bay is as smooth as glass and everything is pleasing to look upon. There are a number of vessels lying at anchor in the harbor. This place, until the Queen's visit to Ireland, was called the Cove of Cork. She landed here, and it changed its name and since then it has grown into an importance which it previously did not possess. Cork is 10 miles up the river. We expect to remain here until nearly 4 p.m. I wrote a long letter to Elizabeth. Loaded all the steerage passengers we could carry and some more Cabin do.

I have been very sea-sick since we left Queenstown and was unable to eat on Friday and Saturday, the 16th and 17th. By lying down, when I wished to keep still, I was able to avoid vomiting; but if I attempted to sit or stand [DEL: for] during several days I was sure to be sick. As it was very stifling and oppressive in the State Room, I kept on deck as much as possible, and by walking constantly I was able to keep up. Bro. Rich was almost all the time well; he only missed one meal; but Bro's Lyman, Dame and Cousin George were very sick; Bro. Van Cott did not escape, though not as sick as the others named. Next to Bro. Rich, very much to my surprise and agreeable disappointment, I was the least sick. I missed but few meals and when able to sit down to the table my appetite was very hearty. From the time we left .the. Channel we had a constant head wind, blowing right in our teeth. Some of the time it was squally and very rough. The vessel behaved handsomely and evinced splendid staunch, sea-going qualities.

[The Journal of George Q. Cannon, 1855–1875, Church Historian's Press, 2016, https://churchhistorianspress.org/george-q-cannon]

170 years ago today - May 15, 1852. Saturday.

[William Clayton]
At 20 minutes to 2 P.M. we arrived and halted on Corn Creek, having travelled 21 1/4 miles. A number of the Pauvan Indians were here to beg, and wanted to trade a female child for a gun and two blankets, but none of the brethren appeared disposed to give as much.

[George D. Smith, An Intimate Chronicle; The Journals of William Clayton, Signature Books in association with Smith Research Associates, Salt Lake City, 1995, http://bit.ly/WilliamClayton]

170 years ago today - May 15, 1852 - Saturday

[George Q. Cannon]
There had been a woman baptised who belonged to the <other> Church; she called upon Bros. Napela and Uaua to administer to her for her disease which was something resembling dropsy [edema]—she tried various remedies but without any benefit—she was willing to covenant that she would forsake her sins and be baptised—they done according and the swelling left her and she was baptised. She attended meeting last Sunday; and afterwards made remarks derogatory to the work, and her swelling returned.

[The Journal of George Q. Cannon, 1855–1875, Church Historian's Press, 2016, https://churchhistorianspress.org/george-q-cannon]